Tangible/Activity

  • Activities Classroom: The student is assigned several tasks to complete during a work period and given the opportunity to select the assignment that he or she will do first.

  • Active Response Beads: This intervention is designed to replace in-class time-out. It promotes students' use of calm-down strategies when upset and enhances self-management skills.

  • Break Card: The purpose of this intervention is to teach students how to recognize when a break is needed and the procedure for taking a break. Additional Break Card Resource

  • Choice-Making: Teachers can increase the rate of compliance to a sequence of academic tasks by providing the students with the choice of the sequence in which they would like to complete them. This can serve as a form of reinforcement. Alternative Intervention Description

  • Chunking Work and Timer Use: Chunking assignments and using a timer can be very helpful to students who are avoiding/escaping school work. It may also be helpful for those students that are easily distracted, have short attention spans, or have difficulty sticking to assignments.

  • Correspondence Training: This strategy is appropriate for young students who have difficulty following directions and staying on task related to skill deficit and/or due to lack of awareness of his/her behavior.

  • Dots for Success: This strategy is appropriate for students who are not completing independent work due to a lack of motivation (vs. skill deficit). This procedure may be used class ­wide.

  • Homework Privilege: This intervention is helpful for students who fail to complete class work due to unwillingness to work during class time, or too much socialization/off task behavior during class time. It is also helpful for students who frequently "forget" or "lose" their work.

  • Motivation Challenge 5: This intervention works well for a student who has a low sense of self-efficacy in a subject area, activity, or academic task and that lack of confidence reduces the student’s motivation to apply his or her best effort.

  • Mystery Motivator: This strategy is a fun and effective method to motivate an entire classroom for which three or more students are exhibiting mild, but frequent misbehavior. This strategy may also be used with an individual student as part of a behavior intervention. Goals can be developed to address a variety of functions of behavior.

  • Points for Grumpy: The intervention is appropriate for younger students who are non-compliant and verbally defiant with the teacher.

  • Response Effort: The goal of this strategy is to make desired behaviors easy/convenient and problem behaviors more difficult to accomplish.

  • Rubber Band Intervention: This strategy can be used for self-monitoring disruptive classroom behaviors. Sample Self-Monitoring Chart

  • Safe Space: Safe Space is a location in the classroom where a student may go to get some time away and regroup – perhaps due to overstimulation, to feeling overwhelmed, to calm-down after an incident, etc. Safe Space Procedures Strip

  • Skip-It Stickers: This strategy is great to use for students who avoid work. They are capable of doing the work, but for whatever reason, they will do anything to get out of it. The function of their behavior is to avoid work, and this intervention meets that same function.

  • Token Economy: Token economies emphasize the use of positive reinforcement in behavior change. After earning a specified number of tokens for engaging in target behavior(s), the student is provided access to a preferred activity or object for a predetermined length of time.